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 Indian J Med Microbiol  
 

Figure 1 (A and B): Classically, contrast properly placed at the ganglion impar forms a “comma sign” when injected at this site, or hugs against the anterior coccygeal border (Figure 1A). Conversely, in instances of vascular uptake, the injected contrast quickly disappears from the target site and/or can be seen in an intravascular pattern (e.g., a venogram appearance, Figure1B)

Figure 1 (A and B): Classically, contrast properly placed at the ganglion impar forms a “comma sign” when injected at this site, or hugs against the anterior coccygeal border (Figure 1A). Conversely, in instances of vascular uptake, the injected contrast quickly disappears from the target site and/or can be seen in an intravascular pattern (e.g., a venogram appearance, Figure1B)