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 Indian J Med Microbiol  
 

Figure 4: An 83-year-old woman with clinical evidence of right hemispheric ischemia shows no obvious infarct or chronic ischemic changes in the right cerebral hemisphere and in the cerebellum on plain CT scan of the head (A-C). Chronic right internal carotid artery occlusion (arrows) is seen on a CT angiogram image (D). Whole brain CT perfusion (E-H) shows matched decrease in CBF (arrows in E) and CBV (arrows in F) in the right middle cerebral artery distribution. There is also decreased CBF (arrows in G) and CBV (arrows in H) in the contralateral cerebellar hemisphere (arrows), suggestive of crossed cerebellar diaschisis

Figure 4: An 83-year-old woman with clinical evidence of right hemispheric ischemia shows no obvious infarct or chronic ischemic changes in the right cerebral hemisphere and in the cerebellum on plain CT scan of the head (A-C). Chronic right internal carotid artery occlusion (arrows) is seen on a CT angiogram image (D). Whole brain CT perfusion (E-H) shows matched decrease in CBF (arrows in E) and CBV (arrows in F) in the right middle cerebral artery distribution. There is also decreased CBF (arrows in G) and CBV (arrows in H) in the contralateral cerebellar hemisphere (arrows), suggestive of crossed cerebellar diaschisis