Close
 Indian J Med Microbiol  
 

Figure 19 (A-C) :Prune belly syndrome in a newborn. The infant had a lax and winkled anterior abdominal wall and the scrotal sacs were empty. A frontal abdominal radiograph (delayed postcontrast image, A) reveals the lax and patulous abdominal wall manifested by the distended flanks. An oblique VCUG image (B) reveals an elongated, dilated, and patulous posterior urethra, with tapered transition into a normal anterior urethra (arrow). Note the grossly dilated ureters and the vesicoureteric reflux (curved arrow). It is the tapered transition of the posterior urethra that helps differentiate this condition from PUV, in which there is an abrupt transition. There is bilateral grade V vesicoureteric reflux (arrow) and grossly tortuous laterally placed ureters (C), in this frontal VCUG image

Figure 19 (A-C) :Prune belly syndrome in a newborn. The infant had a lax and winkled anterior abdominal wall and the scrotal sacs were empty. A frontal abdominal radiograph (delayed postcontrast image, A) reveals the lax and patulous abdominal wall manifested by the distended flanks. An oblique VCUG image (B) reveals an elongated, dilated, and patulous posterior urethra, with tapered transition into a normal anterior urethra (arrow). Note the grossly dilated ureters and the vesicoureteric reflux (curved arrow). It is the tapered transition of the posterior urethra that helps differentiate this condition from PUV, in which there is an abrupt transition. There is bilateral grade V vesicoureteric reflux (arrow) and grossly tortuous laterally placed ureters (C), in this frontal VCUG image