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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR  
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 29  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 337-338
Re: Non-radiation occupational hazards and health issues faced by radiologists – A cross-sectional study of indian radiologists' by Kawthalkar AS et al.


1 Professor, Department of Radiodiagnosis, Sree Balaji Medical College and Hospital, Chromepet, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
2 Family physicain and Diabteologist, VK General Health and Diabetic Care Clinic, Chromepet, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India

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Date of Submission10-Apr-2019
Date of Acceptance03-Sep-2019
Date of Web Publication30-Oct-2019
 

How to cite this article:
Venkatraman VI, Kokilavani J. Re: Non-radiation occupational hazards and health issues faced by radiologists – A cross-sectional study of indian radiologists' by Kawthalkar AS et al. Indian J Radiol Imaging 2019;29:337-8

How to cite this URL:
Venkatraman VI, Kokilavani J. Re: Non-radiation occupational hazards and health issues faced by radiologists – A cross-sectional study of indian radiologists' by Kawthalkar AS et al. Indian J Radiol Imaging [serial online] 2019 [cited 2019 Nov 21];29:337-8. Available from: http://www.ijri.org/text.asp?2019/29/3/337/270113


Dear Editor,

I read with interest the article of Jan-Mar issue titled 'Non-radiation occupational hazards and health issues faced by radiologists – A cross-sectional study of Indian radiologists' by Kawthalkar AS et al.[1] The article had clearly described the high prevalence of musculoskeletal, ophthalmic problems, issues like burnout, along with unique mental stressors such as PCPNDT-related issues. Atwal et al. also had raised similar issues in the Indian radiologists.[2]

I would like to re-emphasize another more dangerous but under recognised health issue associated with radiology – the sedentary working condition of the diagnostic radiologists.[3] Fidler et al. recognised this issue in 2008 and sought to determine the utility and efficacy of a walking workstation during CT scan reporting.[4] Lamar et al. sought to quantify the sedentary work life of the radiologist by surveying the levels of at-work and out-of-work sitting among radiology, paediatric and general medicine residents in 2016 and unsurprisingly found that the radiology residents led a more sedentary occupational lifestyle.[5] However, radiology residents had showed better activity during the interventional radiology postings.

The workstation-based diagnostic radiology reporting typically occurring in the seated position for around 8 hours compromises metabolic health thereby increasing incidence of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity and premature mortality risk.[6],[7],[8] Increased rates of burnout and decreased concentration have been associated with sedentary behaviour.[9] A recent study of middle-aged and older adults has found a positive association between sedentary behaviour and reduced medial temporal lobe thickness, which causes impaired episodic memory.[10] It was also noted that risks associated with sedentary work life do not abate with compensatory physical activity outside working hours.[6] Buckley et al. determined that those in full-time and predominantly desk-based occupation should initially aim for 2 hours per day of standing and light walking at work, with the goal of reaching 4 hours per day.[8]

Radiologists must understand the health risks associated with sedentary behaviour and protect their health by implementing the changes in their work routine like frequent standing (short active standing breaks), intermittent walking, Non Exercise Activity Thermogenesis (NEAT) like moving the legs and tapping the feet, stretching exercises and using height adjustable dynamic workstations.[4],[5],[6],[7],[8] A curriculum providing strategies to increase physical activity and healthy behaviour was effective in increasing awareness of potential unhealthy behaviour and motivating radiologists to implement healthy changes.[9]

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
   References Top

1.
Kawthalkar AS, Sequeira RA, Arya S, Baheti AD. Non radiation occupational hazards and health issues faced by radiologists – A cross sectional study of Indian radiologists. Indian J Radiol Imaging 2019;29:61-6.  Back to cited text no. 1
[PUBMED]  [Full text]  
2.
Atwal SS, Prasad A, Deepak D, Agarwal K. Health issues among radiologists: Toll they pay to their profession. J Clin Diagn Res 2017;11:TM01-2.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Venkatraman I, Kokilavani J. Correspondence: Health issues among radiologists: Toll they pay to their profession. J Clin Diagn Res 2018;12:TL01.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Fidler JL, MacCarty RL, Swensen SJ, Huprich JE, Thompson WG, Hoskin TL. Feasibility of using a walking workstation during CT image interpretation. J Am Coll Radiol 2008;5:1130-6.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Lamar DL, Chou SH, Medverd JR, Swanson JO. Sedentary behaviour in the workplace: A potential occupational hazard for radiologists. Curr Probl Diagn Radiol 2016;45:253-7.  Back to cited text no. 5
    
6.
Hoffmann JC, Mittal S, Hoffmann CH, Fadl A, Baadh A, Katz DS. Combating the health risks of sedentary behaviour in the contemporary radiology reading room. AJR 2016; 206:1135-40.  Back to cited text no. 6
    
7.
Dunstan DW, Thorp AA, Healy GN. Prolonged sitting: Is it a distinct coronary heart disease risk factor? Curr Opin Cardiol 2011;26:412-9.  Back to cited text no. 7
    
8.
Buckley JP, Hedge A, Yates T, Copeland RJ, Loosemore M, Hamer M, et al. The sedentary office: An expert statement on the growing case for change towards better health and productivity. Br J Sports Med 2015;49:1357-62.  Back to cited text no. 8
    
9.
Eckstein DA, Park HJ, Hanhan SB. Creating a curriculum of health and wellness for radiologists. J Am Coll Radiol 2018;15:681-3.  Back to cited text no. 9
    
10.
Siddarth P, Burggren AC, Eyre HA, Small GW, Merrill DA. Sedentary behavior associated with reduced medial temporal lobe thickness in middle-aged and older adults. PLoS One 2018;13:e0195549.  Back to cited text no. 10
    

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Correspondence Address:
Venkatraman Indiran Venkatraman
Professor, Department of Radiodiagnosis, Sree Balaji Medical College and Hospital, Chromepet, Chennai, Tamil Nadu
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijri.IJRI_172_19

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