Indian Journal of Radiology Indian Journal of Radiology  

   Login   | Users online: 2988

Home Bookmark this page Print this page Email this page Small font sizeDefault font size Increase font size     

 

NEURORADIOLOGY & HEAD AND NECK IMAGING Table of Contents   
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 28  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 273-279
Assessment of variations in sphenoid sinus pneumatization in Indian population: A multidetector computed tomography study


Department of Radiodiagnosis, Pushpagiri Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre, Thiruvalla, Kerala, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Amol A Gautam
Department of Radiodiagnosis, Pushpagiri Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre, Thiruvalla, Kerala - 689101
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijri.IJRI_70_18

Rights and Permissions

Background and Purpose: The purpose of our study was to assess the prevalence of variations in the extent of sphenoid pneumatization in the Indian population and compare with existing literature. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study included 500 patients who underwent CT of the paranasal sinuses. The multiplanar reformations of paranasal sinus were assessed for the type of pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus and type of clival, lateral recess, lesser wing, and anterior recess extensions. Results: The conchal, presellar, incomplete sellar, and complete sellar types comprised 0%, 1.2%, 22.2%, and 76.6% of patients. The extensions of pneumatization subtypes in the study population were clival in 76.6% subjects; lateral recess, lesser wing, and anterior recess in 59.7%, 20.4%, and 20.4% of sinuses, respectively. The pure forms were seen in 25.4% and combined forms in 61% of sinuses. The presellar type (1.2%) was less common and sellar type (98.8%) being common in our population compared to the Caucasian and East Asian population. The sphenoid sinuses were extensively pneumatized in our population compared to the Chinese and Caucasian population, the prevalence being 76.6%, 68%, and 44.5% for clival; 59.7%, 46%, and 28.3% for lateral recess; 20.4%, 32%, and 12% for lesser wing extension, respectively. The pure forms were relatively less common and combined forms being more common compared to the Chinese and Caucasian population in our study. Conclusion: The extent of pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus has clinical and surgical implications in sellar and central skull base lesions, and variability in different populations confirms that ethnicity influences the differences in prevalence.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
  Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
  Reader Comments
  Email Alert *
  Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed397    
    Printed12    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded95    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal