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FMRI-MINI SYMPOSIA Table of Contents   
Year : 2014  |  Volume : 24  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 37-43
fMRI for mapping language networks in neurosurgical cases


Department of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, P.D. Hinduja Hospital and Medical Research Centre, Veer Savarkar Marg, Mahim, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India

Correspondence Address:
Santosh S Gupta
Consultant Radiologist, P.D. Hinduja Hospital and Medical Research Centre, Veer Savarkar Marg, Mahim, Mumbai - 400 016, Maharashtra
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0971-3026.130690

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Evaluating language has been a long-standing application in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies, both in research and clinical circumstances, and still provides challenges. Localization of eloquent areas is important in neurosurgical cases, so that there is least possible damage to these areas during surgery, maintaining their function postoperatively, therefore providing good quality of life to the patient. Preoperative fMRI study is a non-invasive tool to localize the eloquent areas, including language, with other traditional methods generally used being invasive and at times perilous. In this article, we describe methods and various paradigms to study the language areas, in clinical neurosurgical cases, along with illustrations of cases from our institute.


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